Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘Pro-Motion music’

Three Audience-Engaging Concerts

Live Organ and Multi-Media Concert Experiences

Created and performed by Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist with David Jordan, media artist

Book now for an upcoming concert season

Contact Jeannine Jordan at jeannine@promotionmusic.org

From Sea to Shining Sea

is the story of the parallel development of the organ and its music in the colonies and the United States. Jeannine,as an actual Mayflower descendant, leads us through the first 200 years.

Bach and Sons

 

 

is the story of Johann Sebastian Bach and his family as told from the perspective of 4 women important in Bach’s life and includes historically informed performance of Bach’s greatest organ music.

 

Around the World in 80 Minutes

is a fast-moving concert that features unique global organ repertoire by native composers, and is as exciting as it sounds.

 

 

 

 Contact Jeannine Jordan at jeannine@promotionmusic.org

The Olympics and Church Music

Well, the Olympics are here again. As in any situation, we like to try to see how it relates to our own endeavors.

Thanks to Wikipedia much of the following information is available to us.

The Olympic Movement uses symbols to represent the ideals embodied in the Olympic Charter. The Olympic symbol, better known as the Olympic rings, consists of five intertwined rings and represents the unity of the five inhabited continents (Africa, America, Asia, Oceania, and Europe). The colored version of the rings—blue, yellow, black, green, and red—over a white field forms the Olympic flag. These colors were chosen because every nation had at least one of them on its national flag.

The Olympic motto, “Citius, Altius, Fortius,” a Latin expression meaning “Faster, Higher, Stronger” was proposed by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 and has been official since 1924. (Obviously a quote borrowed from PDQ Bach who said Fast is good, Loud is better, Fast and Loud is best.)

Coubertin’s Olympic ideals are expressed in the Olympic creed:

The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well.   Whatever…but no one works hard enough to get to the Olympics to fight well, you can do that at a music committee meeting.

So how does this apply to us, to our own herculean efforts at making more meaningful worship music experiences?

The host nation presents artistic displays of music, singing, dance, and theater representative of its culture.

The artistic presentations have grown in scale and complexity as successive hosts attempt to provide a ceremony that outlasts its predecessor’s in terms of memorability.

The opening ceremony of the Beijing Games reportedly cost $100 million, with much of the cost incurred in the artistic segment Who said we don’t make a difference?

Months before each Games, the Olympic Flame is lit in Olympia in a ceremony that reflects ancient Greek rituals. You know, Worship Committee meetings.

Opening 

As mandated by the Olympic Charter, various elements frame the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games. This ceremony takes place before the events have occurred. The ceremony typically starts with the hoisting of the host country’s flag and a performance of its national anthem.

Greece is traditionally the first nation to enter in order to honor the origins of the Olympics.

After the artistic portion of the ceremony, (Prelude) the athletes parade into the stadium grouped by nation.  Nations then enter the stadium alphabetically according to the host country’s chosen language, with the host country’s athletes being the last to enter. Finally, the Olympic torch is brought into the stadium and passed on until it reaches the final torch carrier, often a successful Olympic athlete from the host nation, who lights the Olympic flame in the stadium’s cauldron.

The Contests

 

Anthem 

         Offertory

The closing ceremony of the Olympic Games takes place after all sporting events have concluded. Flag-bearers from each participating country enter the stadium, followed by the athletes who enter together, without any national distinction. The president of the organizing committee and the IOC president make their closing speeches, the Games are officially closed, and the Olympic flame is extinguished.

OR, another way of looking at your own personal weekly Olympic marathonesque activity would be the following:

 

Ring 1 = Prelude

 

Ring 2 = Hymn(s)

 

Ring 3 = Anthem

 

Ring 4 = Offertory

 

Ring 5 = Postlude

Citius,    Altius,    Fortius!!!

Excerpted from an article published in the August 2016 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter by David Jordan.  Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist and David Jordan, media specialist are the owners of Pro-Motion Music and the creators of organ and multi-media concert experiences.  To learn more visit www.promotionmusic.org.

 

Interview with Chelsea Chen – Part II

Jeannine:  In exploring repertoire for our upcoming organ and multi-media concert, Around the World in 80 Minutes, I recently discovered several of your compositions based on Taiwanese folk songs.  You are broadening the classical organ repertoire with these solo organ compositions.  Your compositional style has been described as “charming” and “irresistible.”  Please describe your compositions for the organ and what makes this music unique in our vast organ repertoire.

Ms. Chen:  Awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, I was able to study in Taiwan.  Since my father was raised in Taiwan and I am ½ Chinese ancestry, I made it my mission to study Taiwanese folk songs and bring those songs to a new audience through my organ compositions.   Wayne Leupold, www.wayneleupold.com, has published my works including, A Taiwanese Suite, Three Taiwanese Folksongs, and an organ demonstrator for high schoolers and adults based on Chinese folk tales and melodies, The Moon Lady.

Jeannine:  Your performances take you throughout the world as soloist and with orchestras.  What drives you to share this incredible instrument, the organ, with the audiences of the world?

Ms. Chen:  I want people to experience the organ in new ways.  I want the audience to connect with the organ and its myriad of sounds.  For that reason, I value programs that are stylistically varied.  The average audience member is usually not versed in classical music and especially in organ repertoire so I tend to create programs with a number of short pieces showing great contrast.  My programs may include Bach, Durufle, Chinese folk music, a Jazz Prelude of Gershwin, or a transcription of Peer Gynt Suite.  I want to make it interesting for the listener.

Jeannine:  Thank you to this creative organist for sharing her story with us.  To read more of Ms. Chen’s work and find her performance schedule, please visit her website at www.chelseachen.com.

________________________

Excerpted from an interview published in the August 2016 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist and David Jordan, media specialist are the owners of Pro-Motion Music and the creators of organ and multi-media concert experiences.  To learn more visit www.promotionmusic.org.

 

Chelsea Chen Outside the Box

Jeannine:  Before we get started with more detailed questions, would you please introduce yourself to our readers.  What is your background?  What drew you to the organ?

Ms. Chen:  I grew up in San Diego and started piano at the age of 4.  Although my parents are not musicians, they made sure I had the best of teachers.  Jane Bastien, my first piano teacher, instilled great fundamental keyboard technique and had me memorize everything.  At the age of 13, I was encouraged to study the organ.

The San Diego Pipe Organ Encounter, sponsored by the American Guild of Organists, was my first introduction to the concert repertoire of the organ.  Until that time, I had only heard the organ played at church.  By the age of 16, I had begun studying the organ with Monte Maxwell in Annapolis, MD.  He encouraged me to pursue a career as a concert organist and helped me prepare my audition for Julliard.  My dream came true in August 2001 when I was accepted to study at Julliard and moved to New York City.

Jeannine:  You certainly have an amazing multi-faceted music career with your work as the Artist-in-Residence at two different churches, and as a composer and performer.  Let’s first look at your work as a church musician.  How is your role as Artist-in-Residence at Emmanuel Presbyterian Church in NYC and Coral Ridge Presbyterian in Fort Lauderdale the same/different?

Ms. Chen:  At Emmanuel Presbyterian Church in NYC I play the organ for one service each month.  The music and service is traditional in nature.

At Coral Ridge Presbyterian the worship style is very contemporary for a vibrant and diverse congregation.  I was contacted in 2013 by the Worship Pastor of Coral Ridge to play for the Easter 2013 service. After 6 months of dialogue, my relationship with Coral Ridge as Artist-in-Residence began.  As with my position in NYC, I play one service/month but also coordinate the concert series.

However, my role at Coral Ridge is quite different.   I do play a classical prelude and postlude on the organ, however, for the remainder of the service I become part of the worship band to lead the songs and traditional hymns.   There are no choral anthems but instead the service is led by a fully professional worship band consisting of piano, drums, guitar, and organ.  We all work from detailed charts.  Playing with the Coral Ridge worship band is like playing in an excellent chamber music group.  Rehearsals are intense and structured and it is our goal that worship transcends the instruments.

Few organists are practicing this nascent collaboration.  I am starting to present workshops about organ/band collaboration.  If you’d like to read more about integrating the organ into contemporary worship bands, I invite you to read this blog post, http://www.zachicks.com/blog/2014/1/20/how-the-organ-could-make-a-comeback-in-modern-church-music.html

___

Excerpted from an interview published in the August 2016 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist and David Jordan, media specialist are the owners of Pro-Motion Music and the creators of organ and multi-media concert experiences.  To learn more visit www.promotionmusic.org.

 

Instigate and Communicate

Excerpted from the article, Five Things You Can Do to Breathe New Life into Your Program by David Jordan.  Printed in the July 2016 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter. 

Instigate

Unleash the “Power of the People”

Help people collaborate.

Collaborating will enable you to share your knowledge and work with people who can enhance what you do. The more people involved, the more skills you have access to!

Create learning experiences. We all have a desire to learn and grow, or we and the team become bored and lethargic. The best learning opportunities are experience and sharing with focus.

Your whole team will benefit from collaboration because as a result of sharing ideas and working together, they see how others think, perform and operate. This gives them a better understanding of how your specific team operates at a higher level. The skills and knowledge that each team member can pick up from others can be utilized to make improvements or enhancements to their own contribution.

Solve Problems and Innovate Faster

Team members with unique expertise and viewpoints could allow you to come up with ideas and solutions that you may not have thought of on your own at a faster pace. It allows you to Access to Skills and Strengths, you might not have known were in the room, that can help you fulfill your vision.

Communicate

Stop Talking!

 

If we were supposed to talk more than we listen, we would have two tongues and one ear.” Mark Twain.

Don’t talk, listen.  When somebody else is talking listen to what they are saying, do not interrupt, talk over them or finish their sentences for them.  Stop, just listen.  When the other person has finished talking you may need to clarify to ensure you have received their message accurately.

Prepare Yourself to Listen

Focus on the speaker.  Put other things out of mind.  The human mind is easily distracted by other thoughts – what’s for lunch, what time do I need to leave to catch my train, is it going to rain – try to put other thoughts out of mind and concentrate on the messages that are being communicated.

Empathize

Try to understand the other person’s point of view. Look at issues from their perspective.  Let go of preconceived ideas.  By having an open mind we can more fully empathize with the speaker.  If the speaker says something that you disagree with then wait and construct an argument to counter what is said but keep an open mind to the views and opinions of others

Be Patient

A pause, even a long pause, does not necessarily mean that the speaker has finished.  Be patient and let the speaker continue in their own time, sometimes it takes time to formulate what to say and how to say it. Never interrupt or finish a sentence for someone.

Praise the team
Celebrate achievements together. Reward the team, not an individual. Every group will have a star that excels at everything. Always speak positively about your team. Showcase their talent and recognize their dedication, efforts and successes publicly.

Sometimes it’s not easy dealing with people. But that’s what most of the world’s inhabitants are, people. When we get frustrated we too often speak right out of our…right brains, (see PS) the very emotional part, only coming to our senses after the words are out of our mouths. Oooooops. Provide recognition and rewards. These drive human behavior, and human behavior drives results. Recognition validates people, their purpose, and their life. Intangible rewards can have an even greater impact than tangible ones, but they must be relevant.

Give gratitude.

The most effective way to cultivate positivity in your organization is to acknowledge and reward the behaviors you want. I’ve found that showing gratitude every day has been a game-changer. It helps me.

Your music: 

When you have built a team that understands you, understands what you want from them, understands what they can really do, you will be able to communicate the meaning and beauty of your music even better.

_______________________________________

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist with her husband David, media artist, are the creators and performers of Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes — live organ concerts with multi-media.

Succeed One Step at a Time

Excerpted from the article, Five Things You Can Do to Breathe New Life into Your Program by David Jordan.  Printed in the July 2016 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter. 

Succeed one step at a time

In order to accomplish something meaningful, to get a job, or to do anything, you need to drop softly into a comfort zone. You cannot simply lay down roots instantly and get the result you want without taking many small steps to get there. Break that big picture goal down into systematic, manageable baby steps (think daily bite sized pieces).

Less is more. When it comes to execution, frequency is king. Do a little a lot instead of a lot a little (small, daily progress trumps one big time block once a week)

Document and celebrate successes often. (no matter how small). This is great for rehearsals of any kind. And it’s great for our spirit.

Direction is more powerful than speed.

Focus on progress, not perfection. Be gentle with yourself. Making mistakes is normal (you’re human).

 

Provide recognition and rewards. These drive human behavior, and human behavior drives results. Recognition validates people, their purpose, and their life. Intangible rewards can have an even greater impact than tangible ones, but they must be relevant.

Nothing succeeds like success, it’s really true.

Expand Your Definition of Success

Success is when all parties involved can benefit in some way.

We all like to be recognized for our efforts—give credit generously and often, but with sincerity. The more you give recognition, the more likely it is to come back to you.

Observe those around you.

Everyone is different. Strong emotional intelligence and healthy, lasting relationships are formed by knowing how to best engage each person. When you understand their motivations and reactions from conversations with you or others, you can better understand how to foster relationships with them.
__________________________

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist with her husband David, media artist,are the creators and performers of Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes — live organ concerts with multi-media.

Build a Team

Step Four of  Five Things You Can Do To Breathe New Life Into Your Program.  Excepted from an article by David Jordan published in the Pro-Motion Music July 2016 e-newsletter.

Step 4 

Build a Team

Benefits of building a team:

Multiply your efforts and momentum

Unify your team, efforts, work, emotions

Succeed faster and better with lasting results

Instigate excitement, unleash the power of the people

Communicate your music, ideas, and thoughts

Multiply your efforts

Encourage Teamwork

If you are the director of a musical ensemble, you need to multiply your efforts. Why? Think about it. A one man band is fun to watch as a humorous event. As a serious musical expression, not so much.

A choir, or any musical group, is one of the few things in life we can’t do by ourselves. That’s part of the fun of it, well, it should be. To make sure there is fun involved here are some steps to take. As the leader, director of a group you not only want to but need to multiply your efforts. That’s why we want to have some tools to build that team.

Have a big picture and focus on the big picture
Explain the long-range plans of your organization and reinforce them regularly. Sometimes we are so focused on our next step, we forget where we are going

Set goals for the long and short term. We are often working with volunteers and it is a good idea to help encourage and remind them why they are volunteering.

Team members need to develop individual and group goals. Urge them to set achievable and measurable short-term goals, as well as long term ones. With team-driven goals and a team-developed code of ethics, the group will begin to self-manage. Peer pressure and individual pride will help curb absenteeism, lateness and poor performance.

Establish trust
Be trustworthy and dependable. Honor your word. Treat all members of the team consistently and fairly and don’t play favorites. Rehearsal starts at 7:00. Do it, even if 4 out of 12 are there. The idea will catch on.

Listen 
Be open to the team’s ideas, presented in a formal suggestion program or in a brainstorming session. Thoroughly consider all suggestions and respond to the individual or entire team, whichever is more appropriate.

Be patient
Patience is what helps the long term picture develop in a way that will reduce frustration.

Have fun
Team spirit is energizing and unifying. Take time to laugh together. When team members see each other as individuals, their cooperation and willingness to work harder and more creatively increases.
______________________________

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist with her husband David, media-artist, are the creators and performers of Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes — live organ concerts with multi-media.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: