Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘performance’

Thoughts on art

J:  Any other thoughts/ideas you’d like to share with our readers?

Dr. Spritzer:  Art for art’s sake is of tremendous value, but our colleagues and our friendships that can give it all personal depth and connection and life. The ways in which we support each other are what make our community great and lasting. Do everything you can to support those around you (a high tide raises all ships!), and pay it forward, and never underestimate the value of kindness. Write thank-you notes! Take risks, and do the things you fear the most and be true to yourself and your calling. We are all so, so fortunate to live in a time when we can devote our lives to music and teaching and liturgy and scholarship, and I feel tremendous gratitude for that. It has not always been so, and is still not so in many parts of the world. Thank you to everyone who has supported me time and time again, and I will always do the same!

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Excerpted from the Feature Article of the September 2017 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

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Dr. Damin Spritzer Interview – Part 3

J:  Your summer performance tour recently took you to historic German cities playing incredible organs.  What is it about performing on notable instruments in a place such as the Predigerkirche in Erfurt that is so moving and memorable?

Dr. Spritzer:  Giving performances in Europe is one of my greatest joys! It makes me feel so profoundly connected to the history of the organ. This has been an amazing year of travel, and I pray that it will continue in the years to come.

As I tried to describe earlier , I am deeply moved by how truly ancient our instrument is. This past summer in particular, I played organs that are older than the founding of America. That really, really, really makes you stop and pause, and think about the generations of scholars and artisans and builders and composers that have all come before us, and that are among us right this minute, and who are yet to come in the future. The beauty of Europe and historically-treasured instruments is so special, it moves me to tears to hear those sounds and be in those places. Thinking about Bach’s children being baptized a few feet away at the Herderkirche, or Liszt giving lessons to Reubke at the Nicolaikirche, or Cavaillé-Coll climbing the steps to the organ to keep voicing…It always feels new, and yet it’s not, and I’m certainly not the only one to experience this happiness and sense of connection! But I love every single experience.

It’s a serious privilege and a gift to have those opportunities, and to walk where so many of the musicians we revere lived their lives. For me it adds a level of gravity to my own preparation and scholarship, as well as a deeply emotional appreciation for being able to do what I do. It’s tremendous to experience such incredible history and diversity (and food, and wine, and culture!) by only taking short train rides, as well. That’s something I really love about traveling in Europe and work hard to take advantage of when there.

J:  As a recording artist you have introduced us to the music of Rene Louis Becker.  Why is his music important in the organ and music world?

Dr. Spritzer:  René Becker is a perfect example of a recently-living composer who gave his life to church music and composing and teaching, but through no fault of his own was not remembered right away by subsequent generations. And it’s lovely, lovely music, and he represents both the European and American schools of composition and performance.  (Click here for Dr. Spritzer’s recordings of Becker’s music.) I was very fortunate to be able to work with his music and his lovely descendants who were so gracious to me.

I hope to find more composers and pieces that similarly can be restored to a place in our larger body of repertoire. The discovery process can be time-consuming but so satisfying. I’m not a composer, but if I were, I would hope to be remembered similarly, and to feel that my contributions were of lasting value. So since I do not create new music, I can promote the music of our wonderful colleagues who do! I have several upcoming projects in that vein about which I am very, very hopeful.
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Excerpted from the Feature Article of the September 2017 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

A trailer for Around the World in 80 Minutes – check it out!

After many requests for a trailer of
Around the World in 80 Minutes, it’s here.
Enjoy the trip.

Click Here

I’d appreciate your feedback. Many people who have seen our concerts are truly awed by the experience.
The purpose of this trailer is to help people who haven’t experienced one of our concerts get a sense of what a Pro-Motion Music multimedia concert would be like for them.

For those of you who have seen one or more of our multimedia concerts, would you take a couple of minutes to let me know if this trailer gives a sense of what you experienced? Please tell me if there are additions that you think would help the viewer get a better sense of the live organ and multimedia concert experience.

Any comments you might have would be greatly appreciated.

Please send to
David@promotionmusic.org

For those of you who have yet to see Bach and SonsFrom Sea to Shining Sea, or Around the World in 80 Minutes, I coordinate the live images from the five different cameras with still images and additional video segments in real time, projecting that “finished product” immediately to the cinematic screen.  Jeannine provides the glorious music and narration of the story — all in real time.  These are simply not-to-be-missed audience-engaging concert experiences!

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Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

A Quiz based on “How Playing an Instrument Benefits our Brain”

A quiz for those of you who have read our three prior posts based on the TED-Ed presentation by Anita Collins, How Playing an Instrument Benefits our Brain.

Neuroscientists get excited about watching the brain functions of musicians because?
A  Musicians use different parts of their brain to complete tasks
B  Musicians use more of their brain to complete tasks
C  Musicians use more parts of their brain simultaneously to complete tasks
D  Musicians use their brains surprisingly when completing tasks

Learning a musical instrument engages which different areas of the brain at the same time?

A  Visual, motor and cerebral cortices
B  Auditory, motor and visual cortices
C  Motor, cerebral and auditory cortices
D  Cerebral, motor and fine motor cortices

The bridge between the two brain hemispheres is called?
A  Corpum callum
B  Coopco coolism
C  Capum cullim
D  Corpus callosum

Learning a musical instrument teaches your brain how to create, ______ and retrieve memories more effectively?
A  Store
B  Find
C  Make
D  Erase

Executive function is a series of interlinked tasks that includes planning, strategizing, and attention to ________.

A  Habits
B  Facts
C  Features
D  Detail

Executive function is a complex combination of brain functions that requires analysis of both the cognitive and emotional aspects of a problem or situation. What type of complex problems of situations could you think of that would use your executive function capabilities?

Learning a musical instrument has been found to assist in our memory abilities. How does your capacity to remember facts, ideas, things you have seen and heard, impact on your ability to learn?

“Playing music is the brain’s equivalent of a full-body workout.”

What could be some of the short and long term effects of keeping your brain in tip-top physical shape?

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Excerpted from the Feature Article of the August 2017 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

Comparing the brains of music listeners to those of musicians

Thank you Anita Collins from TED-Ed.

The ideas found in this superb TED-Ed talk could make you want to practice more just because practice helps your brain to such a great degree

When scientists turned from observing the brains of music listeners to those of musicians, the little backyard fireworks became a jubilee. It turns out that while listening to music engages the brain in some pretty interesting activities, playing music is the brain’s equivalent of a full-body workout.

The neuroscientists saw multiple areas of the brain light up simultaneously processing different information in intricate interrelated and astonishingly fast sequences. But what is it about making music that sets the brain alight? The research is still fairly new, but neuroscientists have a pretty good idea playing a musical instrument engages practically every area of the brain at once especially the visual, auditory, and motor cortices.

As with any other workout, disciplined, structured practice in playing music strengthens those brain functions allowing us to apply that strength to other activities.

The most obvious difference between listening to music and playing it, is that the latter requires fine motor skills which are controlled in both hemispheres of the brain. It also combines the linguistic and mathematical precision in

the left hemisphere while the right is more involved with the novel and creative content. For these reasons playing music has been found to increase the volume and activity in the brain’s corpus callosum,
the bridge between the two hemispheres, allowing messages to get across the brain faster and through more diverse routes. This may allow musicians to solve problems more effectively and creatively in both academic and social settings. Because making music also involves crafting and understanding its emotional content and message,  musicians often have higher levels of executive function.  This category of interlinked tasks includes planning, strategizing and attention to detail. It requires

simultaneous analysis of both cognitive and emotional aspects.
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Excerpted from the Feature Article of the August 2017 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

How Playing an Instrument Benefits our Brain 

Thank you Anita Collins from TED-Ed.

The ideas found in this superb TED-Ed talk could make you want to practice more just because practice helps your brain to such a great degree. 

Did you know that every time musicians pick up their instruments there are fireworks going off all over their brain?  On the outside they may look calm and focused, reading the music and making the precise movements required, but inside their brains, there’s a party going on.  How do we know this?  Well in the last few decades neuroscientists have made enormous breakthroughs in

understanding how our brains work by monitoring them in real time. With instruments like MRI and PET scanners people are moitored while doing various tasks. Tasks such as reading or doing math problems each have corresponding areas of the brain where activity can  be observed. But

when researchers got the participants to listen to music, they saw fireworks in multiple areas of their brains. They took the sound apart to understand elements like

melody and rhythm, then put it all back together into a unified musical experience.  Our brains do all this work in the split second between when we first hear the music and when our foot starts to tap along.

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Excerpted from the Feature Article of the August 2017 Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan are the creative artists of Pro-Motion Music LLC.  Jeannine, a concert organist, with David, a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multimedia concert experiences, Around the World in 80 Minutes, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Bach and Sons.

A video trailer of Around the World in 80 Minutes

Click the image below to view a video trailer of our newest organ and multimedia concert experience, Around the World in 80 Minutes.  All the scenes are from the sixteen countries we visit during the concert.   The music is also from the concert and consists of music by native composers of those sixteen countries based on indigenous melodies.

80m-poster-small-240

Visit www.aroundtheworldin80minutes.org to discover more.  To chat with us about our unique audience-engaging concerts, please contact me at jeannine@promotionmusic.org.

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