Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘jeannine jordan’

The Bach and Sons Organ and Multi-Media Experience Coming to a City Near You

Organist Jeannine Jordan with media-artist David Jordan will present their organ and multi-media event, Bach and Sons, to a St. Louis audience in February 2014.  Hosted by St. Paul’s Lutheran Church of Des Peres, Missouri, the concert is part of the Music at St. Paul’s Concert Series and will be presented on Sunday, February 9th, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

In celebration of Bach’s 328th birthday, the Jordans will present Bach and Sons twice in March 2014 in the state of Oregon.  The first concert experience is presented by the Episcopal Church of the Good Samaritan of Corvallis, Oregon as part of their Sundays@3 Concert Series on Sunday, March 16th.  The second Bach and Sons concert experience is hosted by Rodgers Instruments of Hillsboro, Oregon and is presented on the new Rodgers four manual Infinity pipe/digital organ at the Corporate Headquarters Showroom on Sunday afternoon, March 30th at 3:00 p.m.

The Jordans also recently presented Bach and Sons to an enthusiastic audience at the Region VIII Convention of the American Guild of Organists at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Salem, Oregon.

In October the Jordans traveled to Ohio to open the 2013-2014 Music on Market Series at Wooster United Methodist Church, Wooster, Ohio with a performance of Bach and Sons. To learn more about the exciting Bach and Sons experience, visit http://www.bachandsons.com

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist

 

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Are You Planning Time for Reflection this Summer?

Ah……It’s Summer

Summer is often regarded as a time of refreshment, rejuvenation, inspiration, and relaxation.  The spring editions of our professional journals list pages and pages of courses, conventions, classes, and camps to refresh our souls and bodies and prepare our minds and spirits for the work of the year ahead.

Musicians often work and live as much in the future as in the present.  When one worship service ends, the preparation for another six weeks to six months ahead begins.  When one concert performance comes to a resounding and successful conclusion, the promotion of concerts years in advance begins anew.  Before the applause for well-prepared students performing in their spring student recital dies away, the scheduling of the next session of lessons has already been done.  As one newsletter is sent, others are well underway.  Hence the “that was then, this is now, but what lies in the near and distant future is really important” becomes the mantra of a busy musician.

So when should we take time to look back?  to enjoy our past accomplishments?  to learn from past successes?  As a forward-thinking, forward-looking musician and person, looking back and taking time for reflection can be a challenge, but also a great joy.

Some years ago while pursuing a Master of Arts in Teaching degree, I was required to write “Reaction Papers” on every subject imaginable.  The papers, while rather annoying to write, did force me to look at a situation, person, class, professor, or challenge in a deeper way than I might have.  Maybe we should each take on the summer challenge of not necessarily writing “Reflection Papers” but at least taking the time to reflect on the joys, challenges, and successes of the past year before we charge ahead renewed and invigorated for the coming year.  What do you think?                                                                                Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist

Want to Recharge Your Creativity?

Take An Artist’s Date

Several years ago, I came across an interesting book by Julia Cameron, The Artist’s Way.  Chocked full of ideas for recovering one’s creativity and living the artist’s life, I found several of Cameron’s ideas intriguing.  One was the concept of the Artist’s Date.

To quote Ms. Cameron, “Artist Dates are assigned play.  The Artist Date is a once-weekly, festive, solo expedition to explore something that interests you. The Artist Date need not be overtly “artistic” — think mischief more than mastery.

Artist Dates fire up the imagination. They spark whimsy. They encourage play. Since art is about the play of ideas, they feed our creative work by replenishing our inner well of images and inspiration. When choosing an Artist Date, it is good to ask yourself, ‘what sounds fun?’ — and then allow yourself to try it.”

10 ideas for an Artist’s Date

  1. Support the local arts scene. Go to a local festival, music event, art show, play, museum exhibit.  Visit www.bachandsons.com to find the location for the next live Bach and Sons concert in your area.
  2. Grab a stack of magazines, and clip whatever looks interesting or cool to create your own inspiration board.
  3. Read a book of short stories such as  On the Heels of an Organist.
  4. Go for a walk, and take your camera with you to document the experience.
  5. Stop by the library, and check out some CDs.
  6. Take a long soak in a hot bathtub
  7. Visit a “creative” shop that has nothing to do with what you actually do–an art supply store, a fabric shop, a music store.
  8. See an Oscar-nominated movie or a foreign film.
  9. Listen to your favorite music while sipping on a cup of hot cocoa or cappuccino
  10. Watch the sun rise or set

Boundless, unending sources of inspiration are yours for the taking!

Let your world heighten your senses and creativity.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist

It’s Tough, But Musicians Need To Keep On Keeping On

You keep on keeping on. You have ethical consistency and predictability.

The anecdote, “The Gifted Musician” from Hidalgo’s writing, encourages us to consistently and predictably practice not only our instrument but also integrity in our musical life:

“Most people only enjoy listening to music, but some people also enjoy creating music. Some musicians are good, some are better and then there are those who are exceptionally good—considered to have the “gift” of music. But even they have to practice.

I attended a concert recently where a fan of the featured musician walked up to his favorite performer and said: “You’re an outstanding musician!” The artist replied saying: “Thank you, I appreciate you saying so. I practice everyday.”

Just as we as musicians must practice every day to maintain a high level of artistic talent, so too must we practice implementing integrity every day in our musical lives. 

We must keep on keeping on with what we know has integrity as performing, teaching, and church organists.

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