Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘hymns’

Aside

Feast of the Epiphany

A season of four to nine weeks, from the Feast of the Epiphany (Jan. 6) through the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. The length of the season varies according to the date of Easter. The gospel stories of this season describe various events that manifest the divinity of Jesus. The coming of the Magi is celebrated on the Epiphany. The Baptism of our Lord is observed on the Sunday after Epiphany. The gospels for the other Sundays of the Epiphany season describe the wedding at Cana, the calling of the disciples, and various miracles and teachings of Jesus. The Last Sunday after the Epiphany is always devoted to the Transfiguration. Jesus’ identity as the Son of God is dramatically revealed in the Transfiguration gospel, as well as the gospel of the baptism of Christ. We are called to respond to Christ in faith through the showings of his divinity recorded in the gospels of the Epiphany season.  (From An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church – A User Friendly Reference for Episcopalians by Armentrout and Slocum)

To explore the scriptures of the Feast of Epiphany, the Episcopal Hymnal 1982 is a superb resource:


Epiphany Sunday – Hymn #124 – What star is this that beams so bright – Puer Nobis
What star is this, with beams so bright, more beauteous than the noonday light? 
It shines to herald forth the King, and Gentiles to his crib to bring.

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The Baptism of our Lord – Hymn #121 – Christ, when for us you were baptized – Caithness
Christ, when for us you were baptized, God’s Spirit on you came,
as peaceful as a dove and yet as urgent as a flame.

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The calling of the disciples – Hymn #661 – They cast their nets in Galilee – Georgetown
They cast their nets in Galilee just off the hills of brown;
such happy, simple fisherfolk, before the Lord came down.

The Transfiguration – Hymn #129 – Christ upon the mountain peak – Mousley
Christ upon the mountain peak stands alone in glory blazing;
let us, if we dare to speak, with the saints and angels praise him.  Alleluia!

Let us respond to Christ in faith through the showings of his divinity recorded in the gospels and brought forth in the beauty of the hymnody of the Epiphany season. 
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

The Spiritualities of Christian Hymns – a synopsis

Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord,
 always giving thanks to God the Father for everything,
in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Ephesians 5:19-20

Several weeks ago, I had the privilege to attend the Diocesan sponsored workshop, The Spiritualities of Christian Hymns presented by Dr. Carl Daw, Episcopal priest and past Executive Director of the Hymn Society in the US and Canada.  It was an inspiring, educational, enlightening, and spiritual day as we explored and sang our way through many of the glorious hymns of our 1982 Hymnal.  (As Dr. Daw questioned whether we had sung each hymn, I was able to answer in the affirmative each time thanks to the two marvelous Hymn-a-thon experiences we held at St. Bede!)

Dr. Daw reminded us that hymns

  • are sung prayer (singing with and for others is praying with and for others)
  • are a recollection of the readings
  • reinforce the thoughts expressed by the sermon (as was so evident with the hymn sung following Marlene’s sermon several weeks ago, “Come thou o traveler unknown” #636)
  • express enthusiasm for our faith
  • present scripture in new ways
  • are wonderful ways to teach our faith
  • help us experience God’s presence
  • are never simply “decoration” or “moving music” in our service but are sung in praise and glory to God

The oft quoted phrase attributed to St. Augustine, “Those who sing pray twice” means that singing adds to our praise and worship of God—that our voices are gifts, with which we can make music to the Lord.  Sung prayer expresses the joy of the heart, the happiness resulting from one who has encountered Jesus Christ and experienced his love.  St. Augustine was right—he who sings prays twice.  May we sing together—in holy worship, and in our homes—in praise and thanksgiving for all that God has given us.  (Bishop James Conley)

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, is the Minister of Music at St. Bede Episcopal Church in Forest Grove, Oregon. She and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

The Old Year has passed away

  The old year now has passed away;                                
We thank you, O our God, today
That you have kept us through the year
When danger and distress were near.

We pray you, O eternal Son,
Who with the Father reigns as one,
To guard and rule your Christendom
Through all the ages yet to come.

Take not your saving Word away,
Which lights and cheers our sols each day.
Abide with us and keep us free
From error and hypocrisy.

Oh, help us to forsake all sin,
A new and holier life begin!
Forgive the old year’s sins, and bless
The new year with true happiness,

Wherein as Christmas we may live
Or die in peace that you can give,
To rise again when you will come
And enter your eternal home.

There shall we thank you and adore
With all the angels evermore.
Lord Jesus Christ, increase our faith
To praise your name through life and death.

Johann Steurlein (1546-1613).  First published in Sieben und Zwantzigk newe geistliche Gesenge in 1588 in Erfurt, Germany.
Translated by Catherine Winkworth and published in the Chorale Books for England in 1863.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist and David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Soli deo Gloria

Soli Deo Gloria – To God alone the glory

Where have you seen this Latin phrase, Soli Deo Gloria?  We worship weekly at St. Bede Episcopal Church in Forest Grove, Oregon with these words in front of us.  Have they blended into the fabric of our worship space?  Where are they?  This Latin phrase is emblazoned in gold near the top of the organ case.  Why is this phrase on the organ case?

It all goes back over 333 years ago to Johann Sebastian Bach, arguably the greatest organist and composer in the history of Western music.  You see, this man of faith believed that music was a “refreshment of spirit”, and a powerful tool for the proclamation of the gospel.

Johann Sebastian routinely marked the tops of his scores with the initials “J.J.” and ended his compositions with the initials, “SDG”.  Let’s take a minute to look at these two sets of initials.

The initials, JJ were for, “Jesu, Juva” or “Jesus, Help”.   This man, with amazing talent and ability, was praying for help from the very beginnings of his creative impulses. His work was underscored by his deep need and faith.  The humility of a great artist towards his Creator God, knowing that he was watched over, heard, and loved.  God was intimately involved in his work (and more importantly ~ in him).   What a powerful testament for everything we do – Jesu, Juva!
Lord, help me make this my prayer.

And what about the letters, SDG?  Ultimately, Bach believed that music brought glory to God.  At the end of most of his scores, Bach bearing witness to his faith and humility, left the initials SDG, the abbreviation for Soli Deo Gloria, or “To God alone be glory”.  What a powerful testament we have so prominently displayed before us in our sanctuary.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist with her husband David, media artist, are the creators and performers of Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes — live organ concerts with multi-media.

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