Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘classical concerts’

Aside

Storytelling is central to the human existence.

10 Things Classical Audiences Want

We’re all constantly exchanging our own narratives. We do it all the time. We do it on the phone, we do it online, we do it in coffee shops, we do with people we love, we do with people we just met for the first time. This is not new. For thousands of years almost every human culture has been telling stories. Telling stories helps make sense of what it is to be human.

Stories let us carve our initials into the wet cement of the moment.

Creating stories allows for a prophetic dimension to emerge from the relics of our musical heritage,inspiring a reinterpretation. To discover in them something we have not seen before. The story-line both informs and creates a context for the various pieces, all perfectly delightful in and of themselves, but now enhanced by their new placement within ideas quite relevant to our current lives. Can they speak to modern ears, with new meaning? Yes, absolutely.

We know this much: people want to be immersed.They want to get involved in a story, to carve out a role for themselves, to make it their own.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

What kind of things are important for a concert to be enjoyable?

10 Things Classical Audiences Want

The enthusiasm of the performers is paramount. If they look as if they’re enjoying what they are doing, and they can convey that sense of enjoyment to the audience, then it’s made it into a live experience.

Seeing performers’ energy/commitment increases audience members’ engagement/enjoyment. An unexpectedly prominent theme was the enjoyment that both seasoned and novice attenders gleaned from watching performers who themselves seem to be enjoying, and engaged in, the performance.

If the performers are involved and enthusiastic, then you feel that you’ve really gone to a concert that is a very satisfying, integrated experience, rather than just sort of looking at it from the outside. Something that takes you off the street into the world of the concert hall.

Another survey found that concert goers’ emotional needs include the need for stimulation/excitement, escape/fantasy, catharsis/release (“thrill”, “frisson”) and intensity/intimacy/passion. They expect a lot. How do we provide that?
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

Why Use Themes In Your Programming?

What is a Theme and Why is it Important? A theme is a dominant thought, a unifying vision, a moral. It is the central idea behind your concert. A themecommunicates a kind of truth about the way human beings act, think, or feel.

Why should you use themes in your programming?

Themed­ concerts can be edifying and entertaining for students and concert ­goers alike. They are a welcome diversion from the usual potpourri of concert pieces.

A themed concert may contain a few selections of a theme or the entire repertoire may be along the chosen theme. Program notes can tell why you selected a theme and contain relevant information or fascinating tidbits about the theme. No music group is too young or too old to have a theme-oriented concert.

Want to make the concert extra fun? Use student narration or video. For example, for the theme of “dance,” before the presentation of each selection have a student give a brief presentation about that dance style (such as its history or famous figures) or on a screen present footage of people dancing in that dance style as the school band or orchestra plays. Or have some students from your school dance to the accompaniment of the music.

Themes help audiences relate to real-time experiences and build on prior knowledge or experiences with a genre of music. Thematic unitsalso help us pave the way to facilitating learning of a new genre and experiences.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here.  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

CLASSICAL AUDIENCES WANT A MIX OF EMOTION, TECHNIQUE, TO BE ASTONISHED

While attending a narrative-based performance requires concentration and memory in order to make sense of the work (Woodruff, 2008), the enjoyment of a classical concert as an event (rather than merely as a performance) can come from engaging with the music/performance and/or with one’s inner dialogue.

Lydia Goehr’s (1992) book The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works consolidates this idea by examining the rise of the ‘work concept’ in the late eighteenth century, especially through what she terms the ‘separability principle’, by which ‘it became the custom to speak of the arts as separated completely from the world of the ordinary, mundane, and everyday’. (Goehr, 1992: 157) This quote also demonstrates how going to concerts inevitably involves a degree of risk (cf. Radbourne et at., 2009). Unlike a recording or a film, it is impossible to read a review of the exact ‘product’ before you ‘buy’ it; but, counter-intuitively, expectations about the performance may be higher, generated by the anticipation of seeing a unique performance that is therefore a rarer commodity than more widely available mediatized products.

A description of enjoyment being shaped by ‘watching star performers, hearing new interpretations’  reiterates that live experience offers authenticity: it allows concert attenders to experience the work of performers whom they know they like, but in a live capacity: therefore witnessing performance quality in the most direct way possible, as well as being privy to a performance by a well-regarded player that will never be repeated exactly.

 Attending live performances was important to the participants because it provides access to experiencing live sound, which increased the degree to which the listening experience was perceived as ‘holistic’. 13% of questionnaire respondents indicated that either the hall’s acoustics or the quality of live sound contributed to making concert attendance an enjoyable experience: Live music is what matters most in music appreciation. To hear live sound, well played in a good acoustic setting … ah! [Q117/Calum]

One respondent described ‘seeing and hearing world class performers capturing one’s whole being’, while another characterized live concerts as ‘an experience for the senses’. 

These descriptions relate to recent research in music cognition which has found that when participants can both see and hear a performance (as opposed to visual-only or auditory-only conditions) higher levels of physiological arousal are observed, leading to the conclusion that ‘the interaction between the two sensory modalities conveyed by musical performances created an emergent property, a holistic perception that was greater than the sum of its parts’.

For audience members who do not seek a primarily auditory experience, visual details therefore enhance the concert experience: allowing audience members to regard performers as people.  This idea relates to Becker’s assertion that a musical event is not just in the minds of the participants, it is in their bodies; like a vocal accent in speaking, emotion in relation to musical listening is personally manifested, but exists supra-individually.

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, with her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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