Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘church organist’

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Blessed to be a blessing

 I was richly blessed by being a worship participant at the Chautauqua Institute’s morning worship services. A participant in six prayerfully designed, carefully crafted, lovingly presented worship services. It was a balm, a joy, and an inspiration, leaving me with the knowledge that God is with me and among us every day. Now that we are home, I realize that the blessing I received from the musicians of Chautauqua must be shared with my congregation and with my students. I was blessed to be a blessing. I pray each of you seek out ways to be blessed so your music and work will be a blessing to your congregations, your friends and your family. 
If you’d like to learn more about Chautauqua, and I encourage you to do so, visit chq.org.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

Blessed to be a blessing

David and I just returned from an amazing week at the Chautauqua Institution in western New York. Our week was filled with inspirational worship services, profound lectures, superb concerts, creative art, and incredibly interesting people — all in an idyllic 19th-century setting — an American Utopia. Please allow me to share just one of the many ways we were blessed and inspired by our week at this unique place called Chautauqua.

Every day at Chautauqua began with a worship service. The service was traditional in design with a beautifully played organ prelude, a call to worship sung by the choir, a rousing opening hymn sung by the 3,000+ member congregation, responsive readings, prayers, scripture readings, a carefully chosen and wonderfully presented choral anthem, an incomparable sermon, a moving closing hymn, and an incredible organ postlude from the classical or repertoire or one improvised on the final hymn. What a blessing it was to be a member of the Chautauqua congregation for six worship services.

Yes, I was richly blessed by being a worship participant. A participant in six prayerfully designed, carefully crafted, lovingly presented worship services. It was a balm, a joy, and an inspiration, leaving me with the knowledge that God is with me and among us every day.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

Why We Need to Practice

Interesting fact: In a liturgical worship service with communion, how
many notes, on average, do you think are played by the organist?
A. 999
B. 7, 045
C.. 11,023
If you guessed, 11,023 — you are the winner! WOW!
Some organist actually counted all those notes!
Those are a lot of notes to play at the right time, in the right tempo, on a
pleasing registration to lead our congregations in worship.
Some of you are playing for those complicated liturgical services, some of you are playing three hymns and a prelude and postlude, some are
playing a different type service each week. No matter how many notes
you are playing in a service, your congregation is blessed by your
practice! Blessed because you have taken your calling as a church
organist seriously enough to lead hymn singing effectively and
confidently, blessed by the care in which you chose and presented your
prelude and postludes, blessed by your meditative music during
communion. They are blessed because your music enhances and does not detract from their worship. Thank you, church organists, for your
dedication to your craft.
And, what if you are not a church organist, but are exploring music to
play for a recital, to record for posterity, or to play for a family member
or friend, how many notes are you playing?
A. 1.024
B. 6,397
C. 15,978
D. More?
Your practice is equally as important. With each practice session you are building skills, building confidence, working toward your goal.You are
blessing yourself and others with your music.Happy practicing!

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, has a large organ studio with students of all ages and skill levels.  With her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , they are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

I Go to Sing

Recently I found the following poem by Lindy Thompson, poet and lyricist, of Franklin, Tennessee, describing why she goes to church — to sing! We as organists have a responsibility to those church members in our pews to lead their singing –their worship — in a joyful, introspective, lovely, and articulate manner. May you be as blessed by her words as I have been.

I Go to Sing by Lindy Thompson

I might be exhausted and the children might be cranky,
but I will be going to church on Sunday.

Don’t know who is preaching, doesn’t matter –
the sermon may be helpful or not, holds my attention or doesn’t –
it’s the singing.
I go to sing.

I get up,
get clean,
get dressed,
possibly get mad (at not-ready kids, at empty coffee pot, at traffic)
get going,
get there,
get seated,
get comfortable,
get focused
and when the music starts,
get saved.

It’s the singing.
I go to sing.

It’s the willingness to stand if you are able,
the common agreement on page number,
the voluntary sharing of songbooks with people on your row,
even ones you rode there with –
but most of all,
it’s the collective in-breath before the first sound is made,
the collective drawing upon the grace of God,
the collective, if inadvertent, admission 
that we are all human, 
all fragile, 
all in need of the sustaining air, freely dispensed,
all in need of each other to get the key right and not sound discordant –-it’s the hidden life-celebration 
in the act of making a joyful noise, 
all together.

We don’t even have to sound that good.
Singing together still brings home
the we-ness of worship,
the not-alone-ness of life in God,
the best of all we have to offer each other.

When we are singing, I think that I might actually be able to forgive you
for being so terribly human,
and you might be able to forgive me
for being so terribly not there yet,
and we might be able to find peace now,
not postpone it for some heavenly hereafter
but live and breathe it today, 
drawing in the grace of God,
voicing out our need and hope and gratitude and longing.

When we are singing, I can feel the better world coming,
and if I get to be a part of it, you do too . . .

so sing with me,
and we’ll make our way down that blessed road together,
collectively better 
than we ever thought possible.

Shared from the lindythompsonblog.

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist and David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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