Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘church music ministry’

Something About Hymns

A religious song or poem in praise of God is a hymn.

A writer of hymns is a hymnist.

A collections of hymns is a hymnal or a hymnary, which may or may not include music.

The music to which a hymn may be sung is a hymn tune.

The singing of hymns is hymnody.

A student of hymnody is a hymnologist.

And, finally the scholarly study of hymns, hymnists, and hymnody is hymnology.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, church musician and hymnologist, is also the creator and performer of the organ and multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea, as a concert organist.

The Mighty Ocean-Tone

The Mighty Ocean-Tone

From 1871-1873, Henry Ward Beecher, 19th century theologian, scholar, and hymn writer delivered several lectures in the Yale Lectures on Preaching series.  The lectures cover many topics other than preaching, including congregational singing and organs. Expressing the spiritual and ecclesial function of the organ in worship, Beecher provides the following metaphor:

“I am accustomed to think of a congregation with an organ as of a fleet of boats in the harbor, or on the waters.  The organ is the flood, and the people are the boats; and they are buoyed up and carried along upon its current as boats are borne upon the depths of the sea.  So, aside from mere musical reasons, there is this power that comes upon people, that encircles them, that fills them, this great, mighty ocean-tone; and that helps them to sing.”

So organists, put on your organ shoes, turn on the organ, and provide for your congregation the “great mighty ocean-tone” that fills their spirits, encircles them with power, and sets them free to sing God’s word.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, church and concert organist, with David Jordan, media specialist, are the creators and performers of Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea.

Patronage! It is important!

Alright, in 25 words (or 140 “tweetable” characters) or less, what is it that we should do to find those patrons eager to help composers compose, performers perform, and interested in preserving the great music of the past?

  • Decide what it is you really want to have happen with you and your specific art. Directing, playing, composing, recruiting, teaching…
  • Give yourself a test and ask if you really think it is important for people now and for those yet to come.
  • When you decide it really is that important, you may surprise yourself your new found mission.
  • With confidence in your mission, doors will begin to open to people who want to be a part of your dream
  • If you really believe it’s important, don’t hesitate, tell people about it.
  • Your enthusiasm whether quiet or loud will carry the strength to move people into motion.
  • One small warning, there will be people, believe it or not, who will want to immediately douse your enthusiasm. Don’t let them do it. If your idea has come this far, don’t waste your time on people who want to drag you down.
  • It’s interesting how people that have a great attitude and belief end up being with people that share the same thoughts.
  • Think big.  You have the skills and experience to do something great.
  • This is not make-believe blather saying “you can do anything you want”.  You can’t. But you can do great things with the skills, experience, talent, and abilities that you already posess. You just need to release them upon the waiting world and “ask and you shall receive”.
  • Don’t wait to get started. What idea do you have to further the arts in your community?
    * A scholarship program for organ/piano students
    *A school for vocal training with results that will manifest themselves in 6 years.
    *A new addition to or refurbishment of the church organ

    *A new set of bells for your music program
    *A new grand piano for the sanctuary
    *A performing arts series for your entire community

  • *An intergenerational choir that builds itself
    *An AGO chapter with 80 strong contributing members

Take that little seed, that idea has been smoldering for years, that plan that would provide so much worth for your community, and let it explode.  Then ask a patron or four to help you get there, to realize that dream, to keep music alive in our churches, schools, and concert halls today and in the future.

The members of the Music Ministry of our small mission church, St. Bede Episcopal in Forest Grove, Oregon have a vision and goal of not only providing excellence in our worship music today but building on and creating an outstanding music ministry for the future.

With that in mind, we’d like to ask for your patronage – a gift large or small to our upcoming Hymn-a-thon Music Ministry fundraising event on June 7th.  To be a patron of the worship arts at St. Bede Episcopal Church, and help us reach our goal of $4,000, please click here to visit our gofundme site. All contributions will be matched by an anonymous patron.

We thank you for your support, encouragement, and generosity.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan enjoys a career as a church musician and concert organist.  She and her husband, David Jordan, media artist, created and perform two inspiring organ and multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea throughout the US and in Europe.

ASK for Patronage

I believe that there are many people who might not know they are patrons yet, but who would gladly and generously support your music ministry, concert series, studio, or music program.  However, I do believe patrons have one thing in common. They need to be asked for their help.

Before beginning that search and learning how to ask for patronage, though, we have to decide that what we are doing is important enough for someone to support our efforts.  We can get caught thinking “if we only had the money we could get something done here.” Okay, ask yourself, what exactly do you want to get done and how will it benefit others.  If you can carefully and creatively formulate your idea (and put a price tag on it), you might be amazed at what can happen.

Traveling throughout the country to present our organ and multi-media concerts, we have learned so much from our hosts.  The incredible stories they share with us of patronage, of people “making things happen” in their communities in the music and art world, is astounding.

Time after time it is a single person (or a very small group) who has an idea – something they know will benefit the community – who then persuades others to join them as patrons – people working together to create a powerful forward momentum to keep the arts alive.

It would be my great desire that all of us decide that what we are contributing to the arts world is important enough that we can’t let it die (because it certainly could) and we need to pay it forward into the future, for generations that don’t even know they need your art. Today’s patrons, just like Sara Levy and the Esterhazy family of the past, ensure that some of the greatest music and sounds will be available and played for people now and in the future.

With that in mind, we’d like to ask for your patronage – a gift large or small to our upcoming Hymn-a-thon Music Ministry fundraising event on June 7th.  To be a patron of the worship arts at St. Bede Episcopal Church, and help us reach our goal of $4,000, please click here to visit our gofundme site. All contributions will be matched by an anonymous patron. We thank you for your support, encouragement, and generosity.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Minister of Music and Organist, at St. Bede Episcopal Church also enjoys sharing her organ and multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea with audiences throughout the USA and in Europe.

Patrons All Around Us

What do a Sara Levy, Prince Esterházy, an internationally-known sports broadcaster, an organ student, a church member, and my parents all have in common?  They support, protect, or champion someone or something, such as an institution, event, or cause.  They were/are patrons of the arts.

Our Bach and Sons concert begins with an introduction by a woman named Sara Levy. I hadn’t heard of her until we did the research for Bach and Sons program, but I discovered that it is she who was greatly responsible for collecting and preserving much of Johann Sebastian Bach’s music, saving it from being used as wrapping paper or worse. Thanks to her wisdom and her patronage, we can hear today the magnificent music of JS Bach in concert halls and churches.

In the mid-1750s, The Esterházys were one of the wealthiest and most influential families of the Austrian empire and boasted a distinguished record of supporting music. In 1761 Franz Joseph Haydn began his musical service at the Esterházy court.  The patronage by the Esterházy family proved decisive for Haydn’s career, and he remained in their service until his death.  Thanks to the patronage of the Esterházys, Haydn was able to compose in a stable, supportive environment providing for us today a wealth of much-loved concert and church repertoire.

The point of these historical examples is to say that we need and truly appreciate the important work and contribution by patrons to keep our art alive and ensure that it will go on into the future.  It’s what patrons of the arts do: they make sure composers can compose, performers perform, and that the great music of the past never dies.

In today’s world, most of us don’t have a courtly patron, however, patrons are all around us.  They are people from every walk of life who are willing and interested in supporting our music and art.

  • Would you have thought that a professional sports broadcaster would be the sponsor of a fine arts program?
  • Could you imagine a gift to your music ministry from a person who had never set foot in your church?
  • Would you think of finding a patron among your students?  A person who might provide a scholarship for another student.
  • Would you be surprised by a “matching gift” for a church music fund raiser?  A gift from that person who wants to remain anonymous that would double the amount raised.
  • And what about that $110,000.00 piano for the sanctuary.  Would a single gift by one generous patron cover the cost?  Yes!
  • Join millions of other patrons and become a patron today.  The members of the Music Ministry of our small mission church, St. Bede Episcopal in Forest Grove, Oregon have a vision and goal of not only providing excellence in our worship music today but building on and creating an outstanding music ministry for the future.

    With that in mind, we’d like to ask for your patronage – a gift large or small to our upcoming Hymn-a-thon Music Ministry fundraising event on June 7th.  To be a patron of the worship arts at St. Bede Episcopal Church, and help us reach our goal of $4,000, please click here to visit our gofundme site. All contributions will be matched by an anonymous patron.

  • We thank you for your support, encouragement, and generosity.

    Dr. Jeannine Jordan is the Minister of Music and Organist at St. Bede Episcopal Church.  She is also a concert organist presenting the organ and multi-media concerts, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea throughout the USA and in Europe.

Will you be a patron of the arts?

The members of the Music Ministry of our small mission church, St. Bede Episcopal in Forest Grove, Oregon have a vision and goal of not only providing excellence in our worship music today but building on and creating an outstanding music ministry for the future.

With that in mind, we’d like to ask for your patronage – a gift large or small to our upcoming Hymn-a-thon Music Ministry fundraising event on June 7th.  To be a patron of the worship arts at St. Bede Episcopal Church, and help us reach our goal of $4,000, please click here to visit our gofundme site. All contributions will be matched by an anonymous patron.

We thank you for your support, encouragement, and generosity.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan is the Minister of Music and Organist at St. Bede Episcopal Church.  She also enjoys a career as a concert organist presenting throughout the USA and in Europe the organ and multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea with her husband, David Jordan, media artist.

Hymns as Devotionals

I discovered a lot about the 1982 Episcopal Hymnal in preparation for last year’s Hymn-a-thon. Our choir spent 12 hours on Sunday, March 3, 2014 singing every hymn in our hymnal as a Music Ministry Fundraiser. Instead of singing straight through the hymnal, I decided we should sing through the hymns in various groupings just to keep things interesting for us.

Did you know that a section of the Episcopal hymnal is arranged by the church year? Check out the Contents pages of the 1982 Hymnal to locate the section titled The Church Year. As you will discover, hymn numbers 47-293 or approximately 1/3 of the hymns in the hymnal comprise this section. For those of you fascinated with the seasons of the church year as I am, you will find this section of the hymnal most enlightening.

For example, since we have now entered the season of Lent, you may find it interesting to note over the next four Sundays of Lent, how many hymns from the Lent section, hymn numbers 140-152, we will sing in our services. These hymns, along with others illuminating the scriptures of each Sunday will form the basis of our music for Lent.

The hymns of The Church Year can also be used to create lovely devotionals. The text by Claudia Frances Hernaman of hymn #142 could serve as a poignant Lenten devotional. Use a different verse each week of Lent as a mediation, or, as a daily devotional, read through these glorious stanzas to be reminded each day during Lent of the “Easter of unending joy” that is our hope and promise.

“Lord, who throughout these forty days for us didst fast and pray, teach us with thee to mourn our sins, and close by thee to stay.
As thou with Satan didst contend and didst the victory win, O give us strength in thee to fight, in thee to conquer sin.
As thou didst hunger bear and thirst, so teach us, gracious Lord, to die to self, and chiefly live by thy most holy word.
An through these days of penitence, and through thy Passiontide, yea, evermore, in life and death, Jesus! with us abide.
Abide with us, that so, this life of suffering overpast, an Easter of undending joy we may attain at last!”

Take time to look for the rich blessings in this magnificent book, our 1982 Hymnal.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan is the Organist and Minister of Music at St. Bede Episcopal Church in Forest Grove, Oregon. She and her husband, David, are also the creators and presenters of two organ and multi-media concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea and Bach and Sons.

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