Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Posts tagged ‘Bach’s organ music’

Whose Legacy Is It Anyway?

Let me share a legacy with you. Let’s see “when” you guess who left us this legacy.

Orphaned at 10, he and his younger brother walked 30 miles to live with their older brother for two years. He then needed to move on because his older brother and wife were expecting yet another baby. From the age of 12 he made his way on his own, singing in church choirs, playing music as a street musician.  Determined, persistent.

He did not have a formal education but learned composition by “reverse engineering” music scores. Needless to say, he was pretty intelligent, and independent.

It was expected in his country that once you were selected as organist for a church, you would stay there your entire life. He didn’t. He went on to several different positions and butted heads with much of the leadership of towns, churches, courts, and choirs. Patience was not one of his virtues.

He had one job interview that promised fame, comfort, money, and security. One catch: he would have had to marry the boss’s daughter. Okay, well…he walked 200 miles back home to work out plan B.

He was 18 years old when he landed his first choir job and had choir boys older than himself. He ended up in a street brawl with one of them,  a bassoonist, and allegedly drew his sword and cut the vest of his opponent to shreds.

One of the things he did throughout his career was focus on creating glorious music for the church and court. There is no indication that he was hoping for some kind of legacy that would live on forever. He was doing his job. Competitive? I would guess. But consumed with leaving a legacy? No, just truly absorbed with doing his job really well. And his focus was certainly Soli Deo Gloria.

Yes, Johann Sebastian Bach left what we consider a substantial legacy of highly intelligent instrumental music, oratorios, motets, and dedication to his art, and  well, you know: “Soli Deo Gloria.”

Most of his legacy is the great music we enjoy, some of his legacy is the tattered vest of the bassoonist.

When he died, his music was on the wane in deference for more “singable” popular music. Hmm. But there was truth and a  foundation in his music that has driven and inspired us for centuries.

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist with David Jordan, media specialist are the creators and performers of two unique audience-engaging organ and multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea.

Pro-Motion Music Infographic

Find out in this simple infographic what today’s audience is looking for and what we do to fill that need.

Click on the image to view at full size.

www.bachandsons.com

www.fromseatoshiningsea.net

Dr. Jeannine and David Jordan

jeannine@promotionmusic.org

541-905-0108

Have You Found Something Amazing Today?

“If you haven’t found something amazing in music you experience during the day, it hasn’t been much of a day.”

How did you play the piece for the hundredth time and still feel amazed by its power?    For me, that piece is Johann Sebastian Bach’s Fugue in E-flat Major (The St. Anne).  I am and always will be in awe of this profound and amazing music expressing so completely the mysterious and awesome power of the Holy Trinity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJmxQ7zYcow&feature=related

The implication here is that we must pay attention to the everything in each piece of music being practiced, performed, listened to, or taught.  We must actively engage in the work of making music as a participant, not as a spectator. We must bring all our senses into play in each encounter and every circumstance.

Jeannine Jordan, concert organist

You Mess Up, You ‘Fess Up–a Trait of a Musician with Integrity

A musician with integrity will follow another “rule” of creating and running a music studio–“you mess up, you ‘fess up.” You disclose both good news and bad. You acknowledge mistakes, apologize and make amends.

I recently had the humbling experience of having to reschedule an entire week of lessons. I “messed up” and scheduled lessons for a week I would be out of town. I had to “‘fess up” and disclose the news that no matter how carefully I had planned the lesson schedule, it just wasn’t going to work. I apologized and asked to reschedule the week’s lessons. Thankfully, most of my wonderful students changed their schedules to accommodate mine.

For me, a person who likes order and works to pay attention to details, this was a difficult lesson in integrity.  However, because I do respect my students’ time and their need to rely on a set schedule and I rarely make the mistake of having to change their lesson times, all of us made it through a challenging week.  One of us learned that she is less than perfect (again), and the students had the opportunity to show their support of their teacher by reworking their own schedules.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organ and piano instructor with studios in Lincoln City and Hillsboro, Oregon.

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