Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Archive for the ‘Organ concerts’ Category

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Classical audiences want to have fun, to be amused, bowled over, and to laugh

Amuse comes from the Middle French wordamuser, meaning “to divert the attention, beguile, delude.” Averted, changed, entertained, redirected, amused, amazed, dumbfounded, staggered, astonished…you get the idea.

Watching performers increases understanding, knowledge or engagement. It’s exciting to witness music being made in front of you. Audience members recognize that an understanding of how music operates can be gleaned through visual information, and that observing the performance can contribute to an audience member’s engagement. It is part of what takes them out of the everyday into the space of the concert hall.

There is rarely a tension between auditory and visual stimuli. There has been thought that visual stimuli would detract from the auditory. The opposite is true. Most concert goers explicitly expressed appreciation at the presence of visual information. This helped them focus on the experience happening in real-time before their eyes and ears. Visual information is an important part of the experience because it helps provide understanding and/or engagement.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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CLASSICAL AUDIENCES WANT A MIX OF EMOTION, TECHNIQUE, TO BE ASTONISHED

While attending a narrative-based performance requires concentration and memory in order to make sense of the work (Woodruff, 2008), the enjoyment of a classical concert as an event (rather than merely as a performance) can come from engaging with the music/performance and/or with one’s inner dialogue.

Lydia Goehr’s (1992) book The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works consolidates this idea by examining the rise of the ‘work concept’ in the late eighteenth century, especially through what she terms the ‘separability principle’, by which ‘it became the custom to speak of the arts as separated completely from the world of the ordinary, mundane, and everyday’. (Goehr, 1992: 157) This quote also demonstrates how going to concerts inevitably involves a degree of risk (cf. Radbourne et at., 2009). Unlike a recording or a film, it is impossible to read a review of the exact ‘product’ before you ‘buy’ it; but, counter-intuitively, expectations about the performance may be higher, generated by the anticipation of seeing a unique performance that is therefore a rarer commodity than more widely available mediatized products.

A description of enjoyment being shaped by ‘watching star performers, hearing new interpretations’  reiterates that live experience offers authenticity: it allows concert attenders to experience the work of performers whom they know they like, but in a live capacity: therefore witnessing performance quality in the most direct way possible, as well as being privy to a performance by a well-regarded player that will never be repeated exactly.

 Attending live performances was important to the participants because it provides access to experiencing live sound, which increased the degree to which the listening experience was perceived as ‘holistic’. 13% of questionnaire respondents indicated that either the hall’s acoustics or the quality of live sound contributed to making concert attendance an enjoyable experience: Live music is what matters most in music appreciation. To hear live sound, well played in a good acoustic setting … ah! [Q117/Calum]

One respondent described ‘seeing and hearing world class performers capturing one’s whole being’, while another characterized live concerts as ‘an experience for the senses’. 

These descriptions relate to recent research in music cognition which has found that when participants can both see and hear a performance (as opposed to visual-only or auditory-only conditions) higher levels of physiological arousal are observed, leading to the conclusion that ‘the interaction between the two sensory modalities conveyed by musical performances created an emergent property, a holistic perception that was greater than the sum of its parts’.

For audience members who do not seek a primarily auditory experience, visual details therefore enhance the concert experience: allowing audience members to regard performers as people.  This idea relates to Becker’s assertion that a musical event is not just in the minds of the participants, it is in their bodies; like a vocal accent in speaking, emotion in relation to musical listening is personally manifested, but exists supra-individually.

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, with her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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And yet more ways to practice

Excerpted from Wynton’s 12 Ways to Practice, from Music to Schoolwork

Think for yourself: Your success or failure at anything ultimately depends on your ability to solve problems, so donʼt become a robot. Thinking for yourself helps develop your powers of judgment. Sometimes you may judge wrong and pay the price; but when you judge right you reap the rewards. 

Be optimistic: How you feel about the world expresses who you are. When you are optimistic, things are either wonderful or becoming wonderful. Optimism helps you get over your mistakes and go on to do better. It also gives you endurance because having a positive attitude makes you feel that something great is always about to happen. 

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, has a large and active organ studio with students of all ages. She and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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From Sea to Shining Sea – organ and multimedia concert experience

From Sea to Shining Sea Organ and Multimedia Concert Experience

From Sea to Shining Sea is the the perilous story of the early expansion of the organ in the colonies into the US as told by an actual mayflower descendant. It is focused on unique American music and at the same time is more patriotic in nature. It has content unique to our concert, since it comes from concert organist Dr. Jordan’s thesis research. Excellent multimedia concert.

This concert is performed in a rich multimedia format, with 5 cameras, computers and lighting, which makes it even more captivating and engaging for the audience. They become one with the story and they love it.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist and David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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