Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Archive for the ‘Concert Organist’ Category

Aside

Storytelling is central to the human existence.

10 Things Classical Audiences Want

We’re all constantly exchanging our own narratives. We do it all the time. We do it on the phone, we do it online, we do it in coffee shops, we do with people we love, we do with people we just met for the first time. This is not new. For thousands of years almost every human culture has been telling stories. Telling stories helps make sense of what it is to be human.

Stories let us carve our initials into the wet cement of the moment.

Creating stories allows for a prophetic dimension to emerge from the relics of our musical heritage,inspiring a reinterpretation. To discover in them something we have not seen before. The story-line both informs and creates a context for the various pieces, all perfectly delightful in and of themselves, but now enhanced by their new placement within ideas quite relevant to our current lives. Can they speak to modern ears, with new meaning? Yes, absolutely.

We know this much: people want to be immersed.They want to get involved in a story, to carve out a role for themselves, to make it their own.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

People remember stories not facts. Storytelling is what connects us to our humanity.

10 Things Classical Audiences Want

All pieces of music tell stories. They emanate from a certain cultural milieu, and if nothing else, they describe stories of their own creation.

Since humans first walked the earth, they have told stories, before even the written word or oral language. Through cave drawings and over fires, humans have told stories to shape our existence. Things happen to us — the elements of a story — but as humans, we have unique perspectives, which shape how a story is relayed

Anthropologists tell us that storytelling is central to human existence. That it’s common to every known culture. That it involves a symbiotic exchange between teller and listener – an exchange we learn to negotiate in infancy.

Just as the brain detects patterns in the visual forms of nature – a face, a figure, a flower – and in sound, so too it detects patterns in information. Stories are recognizable patterns, and in those patterns, we find meaning. We use stories to make sense of our world and to share that understanding with others. They are the signal within the noise.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

What kind of things are important for a concert to be enjoyable?

10 Things Classical Audiences Want

The enthusiasm of the performers is paramount. If they look as if they’re enjoying what they are doing, and they can convey that sense of enjoyment to the audience, then it’s made it into a live experience.

Seeing performers’ energy/commitment increases audience members’ engagement/enjoyment. An unexpectedly prominent theme was the enjoyment that both seasoned and novice attenders gleaned from watching performers who themselves seem to be enjoying, and engaged in, the performance.

If the performers are involved and enthusiastic, then you feel that you’ve really gone to a concert that is a very satisfying, integrated experience, rather than just sort of looking at it from the outside. Something that takes you off the street into the world of the concert hall.

Another survey found that concert goers’ emotional needs include the need for stimulation/excitement, escape/fantasy, catharsis/release (“thrill”, “frisson”) and intensity/intimacy/passion. They expect a lot. How do we provide that?
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Aside

Classical audiences want to have fun, to be amused, bowled over, and to laugh

Amuse comes from the Middle French wordamuser, meaning “to divert the attention, beguile, delude.” Averted, changed, entertained, redirected, amused, amazed, dumbfounded, staggered, astonished…you get the idea.

Watching performers increases understanding, knowledge or engagement. It’s exciting to witness music being made in front of you. Audience members recognize that an understanding of how music operates can be gleaned through visual information, and that observing the performance can contribute to an audience member’s engagement. It is part of what takes them out of the everyday into the space of the concert hall.

There is rarely a tension between auditory and visual stimuli. There has been thought that visual stimuli would detract from the auditory. The opposite is true. Most concert goers explicitly expressed appreciation at the presence of visual information. This helped them focus on the experience happening in real-time before their eyes and ears. Visual information is an important part of the experience because it helps provide understanding and/or engagement.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, and her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music , are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter for more intriguing and engaging articles – click here  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

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