Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Archive for the ‘Church music’ Category

Aside

CLASSICAL AUDIENCES WANT YOU TO MAKE USE OF NEW TECHNOLOGY

California Symphony’s executive director Aubrey Bergauer says, “I warned them I was going to do things differently.” 

Unlike many orchestras that try to appeal to younger audiences (in the symphony world, “younger” means “under 60”), Bergauer and Donato Cabrera, the California Symphony’s music director and conductor, didn’t start with the premise that there was something wrong with the music itself.

“People think that to bring in younger audiences you need ‘The Symphony Meets the Beatles,’ but a Beethoven symphony is amazing to anyone. You don’t have to ‘symphonize’ pop music,” Cabrera says. “We needed to change the experience, not the repertoire.”

People outside the organization have taken note. “She’s recognized that, as a field, we tend to be ritualistic about how we do things and how we’ve operated behind a sort of veil,” says Jesse Rosen President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras. 


“She’s focused on the quality of the experience, beginning with how an orchestra comes across online, and worked to make it more in line with contemporary audiences. She’s a gifted leader who’s getting good results.”

Participants in a focus group noted that the lack of visual stimuli contributed to a feeling of being ‘disconnected’ or ‘distanced’ during the concert. “When you can watch, you can focus more easily.”   When they were purely listening to music with which they had little affinity, it was easy to become disengaged. However, they experienced the event becoming ‘personalized’ through the ability to see or interact with the performers, as was the case in the other concerts.

Being aware of the audience’s expectations.

Thus the presence of novelty in a classical concert perhaps reemphasizes live classical listening as a distinctive, special experience, as it is distinguished by a greater period of anticipation from the more immediate gratification of recorded listening.

Visual cues are indispensable in helping the listener to [accept] every event just as it comes and [resist] the temptation to fight each one by comparing it with a private version. 

Multimodality in the 21st century has caused educational institutions to consider changing the forms of even its traditional aspects of classroom education. According to Hassett and Curwood, authors of Theories and Practices of Multimodal Education, “Print represents only one mode of communication…” and with a rise in digital and Internet literacy, other modes are needed, from visual texts to digital e-books. 

Other changes occur by integrating music and video with lesson plans during early childhood education; however, such measures are seen as augmenting and increasing literacy for educational communities by introducing new forms, rather than replacing literacy values.

The same holds true for classical music. We don’t need to replace the crucial values of Classical Music but can introduce new forms of presenting it.

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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist, with her husband, David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.   #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

The Old Year has passed away

  The old year now has passed away;                                
We thank you, O our God, today
That you have kept us through the year
When danger and distress were near.

We pray you, O eternal Son,
Who with the Father reigns as one,
To guard and rule your Christendom
Through all the ages yet to come.

Take not your saving Word away,
Which lights and cheers our sols each day.
Abide with us and keep us free
From error and hypocrisy.

Oh, help us to forsake all sin,
A new and holier life begin!
Forgive the old year’s sins, and bless
The new year with true happiness,

Wherein as Christmas we may live
Or die in peace that you can give,
To rise again when you will come
And enter your eternal home.

There shall we thank you and adore
With all the angels evermore.
Lord Jesus Christ, increase our faith
To praise your name through life and death.

Johann Steurlein (1546-1613).  First published in Sieben und Zwantzigk newe geistliche Gesenge in 1588 in Erfurt, Germany.
Translated by Catherine Winkworth and published in the Chorale Books for England in 1863.
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan, organist and David Jordan, media artist of Pro-Motion Music are the creators and presenters of the dramatic story-driven organ and multimedia concert experiences, From Sea to Shining Sea, Bach and Sons, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  #DrJeannineJordan  #OrganAndMultimediaConcert

Hymn-based organ repertoire

Excerpted from the Jordan Organ Studio October 2018 Newsletter.

Most all of us are currently playing some sort of hymn-based repertoire either for use in a church service, for the upcoming recital, or simply for pleasure.

Question: Do you know when the hymntune your piece is based on was originally composed? Do you know the text of the hymn? Have you discovered something interesting about the composer of your piece? Hmmm…a little research makes music come alive. I simply love learning something new about repertoire — and each of you certainly helps me do that on a weekly basis!

My new lesson week began yesterday afternoon with three inspirational lessons following our worship service. All three were filled with hymn based repertoire. My eight-year-old’s lesson (following a service where she played three hymn variations for the prelude) included new hymn based repertoire in addition to her favorite trumpet tunes; my newest student – a talented 13-year-old with the goal to become a church organist, added two more hymns to her “completed hymn list” and prepared a Bach Prelude for an upcoming church service; and Walter and I played hymns from the 1920 Protestant Episcopal hymnal and Bach’s Orgelbuchlein for two lovely hours. Just like the lessons earlier in the week, hymnody played a huge role in each of their lessons.

I simply love the fact that in any given week, with you my wonderful students, I have the opportunity to explore hymns from a myriad of denominations, to learn new hymns (I think Walter got the award for adding the most hymns to my hymn knowledge base this week — who knew the Episcopalians of 1920 had so many different hymns), to see favorite tunes with different texts, to hear creative settings of these amazing pieces, and to simply hear some of my favorite pieces of music.

It’s a really great life being your teacher! I am so blessed!
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Interested in organ lessons for yourself, your child, or your grandchild?  Dr. Jeannine Jordan loves to teach and has studios in Lincoln City, Hillsboro, and Forest Grove, Oregon.  You may reach her at jeannine@promotionmusic.org.  Fulfill a dream…start organ lessons today.

What does the path to organ lessons look like?

Question asked by a precocious six-year-old of her mother: “What does the path to organ lessons look like?”
Answer: “Let’s ask Jeannine and find out.”

The rest is history as they say.  That six-year-old is now eight going on nine and is becoming an organist.  She has been my student for the past two years and is developing her skills as an organist through practice and by watching and listening.  This little girl quickly became interested in not only playing the organ but assisting me in worship.  In fact, the first service where she robed and assumed the Assistant to the Organist role was the Easter Vigil service of 2017.  Now that, folks, is not only a complicated and busy service for an organist but is also rather long.  It could have been daunting, but it was a great experience for both of us.

She has continued to assist me and has also started playing in the service as well.  And what a joy it is!  As the months progress, you’ll continue to hear her music as part of the prelude, communion music, or as the postlude.

A second child of 13-years of age told her mother it was a shame that their church had gotten rid of their organ.  She asked her mother if she could learn to play the organ, so their church could once again sing the great hymns with the organ.  That child has also become one of my students.  She lives across the backfield from our church so is part of our church neighborhood.  Thanks to the generosity of our church, St. Bede of Forest Grove, Oregon, she is able to practice at our church while she works to become an organist for her church, the Romanian Baptist Church of Beaverton, Oregon.

In the coming months, you’ll be able to meet this teenager and other members of her family as she will be a second Assistant to the Organist.  She will assist for the first time on October 14th and play the postlude that Sunday as well.

How exciting it is to help a child realize a dream.  How exciting it is to not only have the opportunity to enrich my life by teaching these extremely talented girls, but also to have the opportunity to mentor new organists for our church from within our community and neighborhood.

SOLI DEO GLORIA
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Interested in organ lessons for yourself, your child, or your grandchild?  Dr. Jeannine Jordan loves to teach and has studios in Lincoln City, Hillsboro, and Forest Grove, Oregon.  You may reach her at jeannine@promotionmusic.org.  Fulfill a dream…start organ lessons today.

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