Dr. Jeannine Jordan, Concert Organist

Archive for March, 2016

Still More Inspiration

Inspired organizations work from the inside out.

From the “Why” to the “How” to the “What.”

Inspired music organizations work from the inside out. What’s the purpose, the “Why” of what you are doing? If there is a group of people who should be inspired by the past, it is us, whose musical heritage is built into centuries of our genetic codes. We have stories of inspiration and a HUGE “WHY” of what we are doing. When you become convinced of how important the “Why” is, you will be surrounded by inspired people. Your music will take on new dimensions and peoples’ hearts will be moved.

“Life, he realized, was much like a song. In the beginning there is mystery, in the end there is confirmation, but it’s in the middle where all the emotion resides to make the whole thing worthwhile.”   Nicholas Sparks, The Last Song

If you as the leader of your music program have a strong sense of “Why,” share your feelings, you will find that people will suddenly find the time and effort to join you in your pursuit, which may share as their pursuit. Even if they don’t have a full understanding of the “What” and “How,” they will move with you.

“The perfect situation is to be inspired by inspiring others to transcend themselves.”  Moi

We all have a strong desire to have a purpose to do something larger than ourselves. You can be the catalyst to draw people into that larger than life purpose.

“Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend.”   Ludwig Von Beethoven

 “And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.”    Friedrich Nietzsche

“Music is about more than connecting notes. It connects people!”    Michele Jennae

Go, Inspire, and be Inspired.
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Excerpted from an article by David Jordan, media artist, published in the March 2016 issue of the Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Mr. Jordan and his wife, concert organist Jeannine Jordan, are the creators and performers of three unique audience-engaging multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Contact Jeannine at jeannine@promotionmusic.org to learn more of these unique events.

More Inspiration

“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.” 
Albert Einstein

How do we inspire – lead with inspired intention? You may find this interesting, and helpful.

Our brain has many important areas. Three of them control the:

1. “What.” Neo Cortex, the rational part, (thinking, rationalizing, learning, consciousness and voluntary movement).

2.  “How.” Cerebellum, language and finer coordinating motor skills and the part that builds trust and loyalty.

3.  “Why.” Limbic, the part that drives us to action.

The “What” part of our brain is the rational part, the Neo Cortex. The part of the brain we don’t understand when we can’t figure out why, “with all these facts,” people aren’t thinking like we do or taking action the way we know they should
The “How” part of our brain is in between the “What” and “Why” part and often in a quandary interpreting between the rational and the total emotion.

 

The “Why” is the deepest part of our brain, the limbic system, it doesn’t have a language but is the driver of action. The action takes place when it understands the “Why.”

“Why,” without the filter of the “What,” is rational thinking. It is the oldest part of our brain and has watched out for us for eons. It drives us into or away from action.

Here’s why “Why” is important for Inspiration.

“People don’t buy (buy into) What you do, they buy Why you do it.”  Simon Sinek

To be inspired, remember, look back, on “Why” you are doing what you are doing. We have centuries of examples of “Why” individuals whose names are still with us today. People whose whole heart was behind “Why” they did what they did.

We spend so much of our time on the “What,” of what we do: rehearsing, practicing, meetings, filing, planning, etc., these are important and necessary. However, we forget about the most important part of our life and purpose, and that is the “Why.”

As organists we can be especially focused on the “What.” The type of organ, parts and pieces thereof. The absolutely perfect edition of the music…

All around us are people desperately needing us to remember to spend time reviving, rekindling, the “Why” that gives us inspiration and inspires them. For it is the “Why” of what we are doing that can inspire us, give us the powerful intentional forward momentum. It is also that strong sense of “Why” that will help others be inspired to move with us.
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Excerpted from an article by David Jordan, media artist, published in the March 2016 issue of the Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Mr. Jordan and his wife, concert organist Jeannine Jordan, are the creators and performers of three unique audience-engaging multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Contact Jeannine at jeannine@promotionmusic.org to learn more of these unique events.

Inspire

in·spire

inˈspī(ə)r/

verb
Fill (someone) with the urge or ability to do or feel something, especially to do something creative.

Affect, animate, arouse, cause, embolden, excite, galvanize, impress

in·spired

inˈspī(ə)rd/

adjective

Of extraordinary quality, as if arising from some external creative impulse.

“They had to thank the choir for the inspired singing”

Activated,animated,encouraged,energized,exhilarated, influenced

motivated, moved

Inspired

“I just can’t listen to any more Wagner, you know…I’m starting to get the urge to conquer Poland.”  Woody Allen

Okay, I don’t know if that’s the inspiration we are looking for in our music, but it is inspiration. We often find ourselves in one of two positions, that of needing to inspire or that of needing to be inspired.

Sometimes our effort of inspiring leaves us depleted and feeling that inspiration has left us forever. Rejoice, it hasn’t. Those are the times we need to let our souls, minds, and heart rest and get an infilling of inspiration ourselves.

“Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration,

if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning.” Igor Stravinsky

“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent” 
 Victor Hugo

We as musicians have been given such a tremendous gift.  So many people truly need what we have for them.  Sometimes we forget that. Even when we might not feel inspired there are people we need to inspire. We look outward for inspiration but we have it in our hands, feet, head, and most of all in our own hearts.

With the tremendous gift we have been given, we have an obligation to inspire others and remember to  allow ourselves to be inspired. Sometimes we are amazed at the sounds that emanate from that most magnificent of instruments on which we work, and are taken aback that we helped create that sound that is beyond words.

“Music . . . can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable.”
Leonard Bernstein

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Excerpted from an article by David Jordan, media artist, published in the March 2016 issue of the Pro-Motion Music e-newsletter.  Mr. Jordan and his wife, concert organist Jeannine Jordan, are the creators and performers of three unique audience-engaging multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Contact Jeannine at jeannine@promotionmusic.org to learn more of these unique events.

 

 

 

The Music of March

What Music Will You Play This Month?

 Favorite Repertoire? 

As I write this blog post, David and I are on a flight home from St. Louis where we had a grand time presenting  our From Sea to Shining Sea concert experience at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Des Peres, where I played some of my favorite organ repertoire on a marvelous Martin Ott pipe organ.  The organ had several new additions – some of which were heard for the first time in our concert — a third manual playing a stunning 12 stop Rueckpositiv with one of the most gorgeous Cornets I’ve heard, a full-length sanctuary rumbling 32’ Bourdon, a powerful 32’ pipe/digital Bombarde, an amazingly bright and joyous Zymblestern, and a thrilling Trumpet en Chamade.  I had a grand time deciding how to use every stop on the organ somewhere in the concert.   (Martin Ott is the builder of the two organs at Mt. Angel so you have some idea of how much I enjoyed the weekend!)

What is your favorite piece?  How can you work it into a service, a concert, or your weekly practice?

Hymns? 

As we fly over the incredibly varied landscape between St. Louis and Portland – the plains, the Grand Canyon, the Sierras and up the coast, I’m reminded that March is filled with incredibly varied hymnody.  Hymnody that ranges from contemplative Lenten hymns to joyous Palm Sunday processional hymns, somber Holy Week hymns, to the glorious hymns of Easter culminating for most of us with Christ the Lord Is Risen Today.  For you church musicians, hymn practice should be at the top of your practice list this month.  Since the tunes of this month don’t often appear with other texts, the reality is we don’t play them often.

Be safe and start working on these hymns today!

New Repertoire? 

David and I are planning the World Premiere performance of our newest organ and multi-media concert experience so guess what I’ve been doing?  Looking for new repertoire to fit our theme, “Around the World in 80 Minutes.”  I’ve been talking to composers and organists from Nigeria to Australia and many many countries in between to collect organ pieces by national composers using indigenous folk tunes and hymnody.  WOW!  Has this been fun!  New music has been arriving weekly at the Jordan home.  So set a goal and discover some new repertoire to play.

March is the month for new repertoire.

It looks like a busy month ahead!  Here’s to the Music of March!
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Dr. Jeannine Jordan is teacher, church musician, and concert organist.  She and her husband, David who is a media artist, are the creators and performers of three organ and multi-meida concert experiences, Bach and Sons, From Sea to Shining Sea, and Around the World in 80 Minutes.  Contact Dr. Jordan at jeannine@promotionmusic.org to learn more about these audience-engaging concerts.

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